Heidi series // by Johanna Spyri & Charles Tritten

  • Heidi by Johanna Spyri – published 1880
  • Heidi’s Grows Up by Charles Tritten – published 1938
  • Heidi’s Children by Charles Tritten – published 1939

It had been a very, VERY long time since I had read Spyri’s classic, so I was a little apprehensive about it.  Sometimes books you remember enjoying as a child aren’t as interesting as an adult.  However, I shouldn’t have been concerned – Heidi drew me right in and, despite the fact that there was never anything urgent about the plot, kept me turning the pages.

There was a lot about this story that I had either misremembered or possibly may have been remembering other versions/movies/picture books/etc.  For instance, Heidi is a very little girl when this story starts.  Orphaned, she is taken by her rather self-centered aunt to live with her grandfather on the mountain (aka the Alm).  Her grandfather, who is known by everyone as the Alm-Uncle, is a bitter old hermit, and everyone is a bit horrified that Heidi’s aunt is abandoning Heidi to Alm-Uncle’s tender mercies.  However, Heidi’s cheerful presence – and Alm-Uncle’s innate kindness, long-stifled – means that the two of them get along surprisingly well.  Heidi also makes friends with Peter, who lives in a ramshackle house halfway down the Alm, and takes care of everyone’s goats.

Just as Heidi has settled happily into her new home, her aunt reappears on the scene and basically kidnaps Heidi to take her back to Frankfurt.  There, her aunt has found a very rich family who is looking for a companion for their little girl, Clara, who is ill and can’t walk.  Heidi’s aunt lies to Heidi, reassuring her that Heidi can return home whenever she wishes to.  In the city, Heidi has a difficult time adjusting, and meets some people who are helpful and kind, and others who do not even try to understand her situation.  Eventually, Heidi makes it back to the mountain, where she helps the Alm-Uncle reenter society in the mountain village and to heal old wounds for happy endings all around.

I had forgotten how much of the story actually takes place in Frankfurt rather than in the mountains, and there are parts of this story that are genuinely heart-wrenching.  Clara, the rich girl, is kind and friendly, but lives with servants as her mother is dead and her father often away on business.  The governess/housekeeper isn’t purposefully cruel, but has no patience for Heidi (despite the fact that she is a very young girl) and can be quite mean and dismissive.  However, there are good adults in Frankfurt as well, and everything does work out in the end.

The story has fairly strong religious tones, but they fit organically into the story.  Heidi’s simple faith grows as she begins to see how God works things in her life to make things come out well, even when they seem difficult or bad in the beginning.

I will say that at the beginning of the story Peter is already 11 or 12, so about seven years older than Heidi, yet somehow he seems to stay the same age as Heidi get solder until they’re about the same by the end!

The two sequels to Heidi were written by Charles Tritten, who translated many of Spyri’s books.  Tritten felt that Spyri would approve of further tales of Heidi, and his books definitely reflect the same gently religious tone.  I didn’t find Tritten’s storytelling to be as engaging as Spyri’s.  While perfectly fine stories, they felt a little more childish somehow.  Heidi Grows Up isn’t really that much about Heidi – it’s a great deal more about a young boy in the village whom nobody likes named Chel. It starts with Heidi away at school, but that’s only for a chapter or two, then she comes home and becomes the teacher in the village, and then the rest of the book is about Chel!

In the same way, Heidi’s Children isn’t really about Heidi’s children – it’s about the young sister of Heidi’s friend who comes to stay with Heidi and her husband.  It was my least favorite of three – by this time the Alm-Uncle is a very old man, and while Tritten builds up to his death gently, it’s still very sad and felt out-of-place in a children’s book.  The girl who comes to stay with them, Marta, throws strange temper-tantrums that didn’t seem to fit with her purported age.  Tritten also chooses to tell the Alm-Uncle’s back story, which is also very sad, giving the entire book a very down tone.

Overall, while these were all pleasant reads, I only see myself rereading the original book in the future.  I liked hearing Tritten’s take on Heidi’s future, but think I’ll stick with Spyri’s classic from here on.